TIME AND TIDE

A Great Yarmouth gem and must see museum, the Time and Tide presents an outstanding permanent collection documenting the rich history of the town’s fishing industry and offers a sober reflection on the challenges it continues to face. In addition, there are two marvellous galleries for touring shows, presently housing the terrific Fisherwomen exhibition, by Craig Easton.


Street Scene Reconstruction

Excellent reconstruction of a Great Yarmouth Row (narrow passageway street) and the inside of homes. Far right, photo of a row before WWI.

History of Time and Tide Museum

The following is a cut directly from the gallery website, https://www.museums.norfolk.gov.uk/time-tide

Time and Tide occupies the premises of the Tower Fish Curing Works, originally built c.1850 and enlarged in 1880. The works closed in 1988.

In 1998 the Tower Fish Curing Works were purchased for conversion into a museum – designed by Norwich architects Purcell Miller Tritton.

The museum tells the story of Great Yarmouth and its herring industry and the lingering aroma of the smokehouse remains today. 

A town built on herrings

Visitors are taken on a well curated journey of the herring industry, with beautifully created rooms that avoids the schmaltz that sometimes accompanies recreated scenes.

Left to right: Reighing room, Woman with herrings, Barrel stencilling, Fisherman with catch

Fashion

Because of the nature of the work, coastal towns had their own fashion, and one enterprising local entrepreneur has realised that there is probably a good market for such garments today.

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Spin off industries

A short film on the Great Yarmouth basket industry was absorbing, and as with the clothes it is one of those industries that could easily make a small come back as the world continues to turn its back on plastics.

Left to right: Short film on the importance of baskets to the herring industry, Selection of baskets, A port for 800 years

Other machinery

The museum has an eclectic range of machines.

Left: Herring packing machine, Right: A mutocope

Gallery architecture and curation

The gallery is housed in a beautiful building, sensitively designed and lovingly restored with a clever use of sculpture and illustration to provide the viewer with a strong sense of life in a smoke house.

Left: Roof rafters, Right: Illustration of herrings being smoked

Left to Right: Head of Britannia (concrete, around 1850), Glass herring sculpture, Excellent series of stories of people from overseas who moved to Great Yarmouth

Fisherwomen touring exhibition

Fisherwoman is a moving and informative travelling photo exhibition of the often forgotten women of the herring industry. The narrative plots the path of the boats that would follow the herrings from Shetland down the North Sea, bringing catches to shore all along the east coast where women would gut, pack and sell the fish.

Thinking of modern Great Yarmouth

The Time and Tide and the Craig Easton exhibition shines a light on a place like Great Yarmouth, providing detail on how such a place evolves and why some things that may appear odd to outsiders makes perfect sense within the town. Whether considering the diet, the housing or the drinking, only by visiting such cultural places can a real glimpse into the past be found that determines the present and likely shapes the future.

John M

One comment

  1. Reply

    Hi John Erica Dhawan’s idea of ‘connectional intelligence’ used to inform body language for online communication/meeting https://ericadhawan.medium.com/9-ways-to-improve-your-video-meetings-f480b8d05ecd

    Could be useful? Best

    On Mon, 23 Aug 2021 at 23:20, Haphazard Business wrote:

    > Platform-7 Events posted: ” A Great Yarmouth gem and must see museum, the > Time and Tide presents an outstanding permanent collection documenting the > rich history of the town’s fishing industry and offers a sober reflection > on the challenges it continues to face. In addition, there” >

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